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How to have happy and healthy skin for longer

 

Daphne K Knows. LAJOIE SIKIN Belly Dancing. Happy and Healthy skin through dance

Begin from the inside and SWEAT it out!  For happy and healthy skin for longer, you don’t need expensive miracle potions and lotions.  All you need is discipline and a holistic and balanced approach to skincare.

We all know that exercise is good for our heart, but did you know that it is also good for the largest organ of the body?  Our skin is our largest organ and one that plays a vital role in protecting all of our internal organs.

Every 35 days our skin replaces itself, is that not truly amazing?  Our skin  is constantly changing and regenerating itself, whist remaining waterproof.

Regular exercise is key to having healthy glowing skin as we age.  Any type of exercise, dancing, walking, running and any type of deep breathing, is not only good for your mind and body, but it is also great for you skin.

Sweaty bodies are healthy bodies.   Every time you SWEAT it out, your skin says “Thank you!”

Promotes healthy circulation

Any physical activity done consistently promotes healthy circulation and this is like cleansing your skin from the inside.

As the blood circulation increases, more blood cells reach the skin cells delivering oxygen and nutrients which help create new skin cells and repair those cells that have been damaged from free radicals (toxins).  What this means in a nutshell is, less toxins equals brighter healthier skin

Exercise also promotes the production of fibroblasts, which are the skin cells responsible for collagen.

Collagen plumps and rejuvenates the skin, meaning exercise is an effective skin anti-ager.

If you have dermatological conditions such as acne, rosacea, eczema or psoriasis, don’t let these skin problems stop you from getting out and being active.

When you are exercising just be careful as to how you dry the sweat from your skin. The best way to dry your skin, is to gently pat (don’t rub) using a soft clean towel.

 

Reduces Stress

Emotional stress can affect, reveal or even exacerbate a number of skin related issues, like acne, rash or even chafing. There is increasing evidence that stress influences the disease processes and contributes to the inflammation through modulating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.(HPA Axis).

How? Check this out:

stress impacts hpa by daphnekknow

When we are stressed our body produces more of the hormones cortisol, adrenalin and norepinephrine.

Too much cortisol can suppress the immune system, increase blood pressure and sugar, decrease your libido, contribute to weight gain, stimulate the production of acne and the list goes on.

Noradrenaline helps shift blood flow away from areas where it might not be so critical, like the skin, and directs it towards more of what it considers to be an essential area at the time when the body is under stress, like the muscles.

If you already have an existing skin condition, an increase in these hormones will make your skin issues flare up.

The skin, endocrine, nervous & immune system is not autonomous of each other, it is a large multidirectional & complex system that interrelates with each other.  Hence why I recommend a holistic and balanced approach to skincare.

The stress that begins from the inside, your brain, will eventually show on the outside, your skin.

Daily exercise, at least 30 minutes per day, will help reduce your stress levels.

 

Speeds wound healing

Our skin starts to age in our mid twenties and as we age, its ability to heal slows down.

A study in older adults found that regular exercise may speed up the wound-healing process by as much as 25 percent.

The faster a wound heals the lesser the chance of getting an infection.

 

Exercising Outdoors

If you are exercising outdoors, ensure that your skin if well protected from the sun, by applying sunscreen with a high SPF over 30+ and by wearing a hat.

Before applying sunscreen, check the expiry date and don’t leave it sitting in a hot steamy car for days.

When applying sunscreen make sure that you have applied it on the back of your hands, tips of your ears and the back of your neck.

Best still, keep out of the sun between the hours of 10am and 4pm, as this is when the sun is at its strongest and can cause the most damage from premature aging to skin cancer.

If you have acne prone skin, choose a gel or oil-free product or one of the powder products that contains SPF protection.

 

Before Exercising

It is best to clean your face and be free of any make-up as this can lead to breakouts, irritate already sensitive or problem skin.

 

After Exercising:

Make sure after you sweat it out and that you wash it off immediately with warm water.

EAT REAL food

A balanced approach to eating food is sustainable.  The food and drink that we consume is used by our body to nurture and create new skin cells every month, so choose wisely.

I do not believe in “fad diets”, “restrictions”, “meal replacements” or anything other than old fashioned REAL FOOD which is cooked from fresh ingredients.

Make healthy eating a habit not a diet!

Preparing your own meal may appear to be time consuming versus the convenience of buying ready-made food. But our organs are worthy of some extra love and attention.

I believe in eating a balanced diet and one rich in antioxidants (fruits, dark green vegetables, legumes and fish).

A diet rich in essential fatty acids (omega 3), like salmon, tuna, mackerel, almonds and seed, is not only good for combating fine lines, wrinkles, but other skin problems such as  acne, eczema and psoriasis.

I enjoy a low glycemic index (GI) diet, (apart from the fact that I have both diabetes and heart disease in my family history).  Consuming food with  a low GI diet has been demonstrated to have an ability to correct the increased production of oil for acne prone skin. Plus eating food with a low GI helps deliver energy to your body gradually and so you feel less hungry for longer.

Drink the gift of life

It is recommended that we drink 2 litres of water a day.  Keep hydrated while exercising and ensure that you replenish lost fluids by guzzling down water after training.  Resist the temptation of having a coffee or one of those high in sugar “Sports drinks” immediately after exercising.

Drink water, the gift of life!

Regular exercise is a great way of firming up the muscles that the skin rests on.  Toned muscles look and feel pretty awesome and present a youthful appearance.

I am not plugging a specific product for you to use and naturally I could do, being I am a cosmetic chemist. I am encouraging a holistic approach to skin care. A routine which begins from the inside with how we can strengthen our body through exercise and nourish it with what we eat and drink.

At different stages in life, we will all have some type of concern with respect to our skin. Whether it be acne, eczema, dermatitis, chafing, wrinkles, too oily, too dry or itchy.  Let me reassure you, every single human being on this planet has some challenge that they need to overcome. Our attitude and our response towards these challenges is what makes all the difference.

Begin with the end in mind and SWEAT IT OUT!

I am passionate about dance as a form of exercise, what is your passion?

 

The Nose Knows.

Daphne K Knows.

Founder of LAJOIE SKIN and the anti-chafe cream, Calmmé.

Catch up with me on facebook, twitter, instagram,

 

 

 

 

References:

 

Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland. areich@derm.am.wroc.pl, 2010

Wagner, Holly: Study, “Exercise helps heal wound healing in older adults”. Jan 3 2005. http://www.worldhealth.net/news/exercise_helps_speed_wound_healing_in_ol/

BBC. “Organs – Skin.” (May 28, 2010) http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/factfiles/skin/skin.shtml

National Geographic. “Skin.” (May 27, 2010) http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/health-and-human-body/human-body/skin-article.html

Dermatology, American Academy of. 2007. Feeling Stressed? How Your Skin, Hair And Nails Can Show It. [Online] 12 November 2007. [Cited: 30th August 2016.] https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071109194053.htm.

 

6 replies
  1. Michelle Jaggard-Lai
    Michelle Jaggard-Lai says:

    Hi Daphne

    Enjoyed your blog as found it to be very true.

    Totally agree that a simple holistic positive approach is the easiest way to gain great results & enjoying a healthy form of excercise relieves stress & as is doing more of the things you love brings happiness & health.

    I come from the tennis sporting Industry & treat learning a sport with a similar approach as I have enjoyed playing sport all my life playing professionally and socially & have enjoyed playing the game at every level. Today I teach the game to others and what I know is that there are no quick fixes just learning more effectively, having self awareness to pinpoint the area you enjoy the most about playing the game provides more enjoyment & a great workout at every level. Also when someone is actively engaging in learning with a positive attitude it promotes having more fun & ultimately good health due to the benefits of excercise as you stated.
    Start in short bursts, then build bit by bit as then it is easy & will save time , stress & money.

    Skin is affected by stress. I was recently in hospital and found with an active positive attitude to recovery I could see my skin changed dramatically as blood flow improved & regulated , stress lowered & happiness followed with a quick recovery right behind.

    I personally think a healthy lifestyle recipe is to be true to yourself, do things you enjoyed as a child & have great memories of, learn what tools work best for you to regulate stress on a daily basis and use humour to enjoy the light side of life which improves quality of life & longevity.

    Thanks for sharing

    Michelle Jaggard -Lai
    Wakehurst Tennis

    Reply
    • Daphne
      Daphne says:

      Wow Michelle, you are a legend! I am so chuffed that you have taken the time to write such a detailed and beautiful response to my post. WE can all learn from you, not only from your huge success as a Professional athlete at a global level, but as generous, kind and good human being. Thank you so very much. x

      Reply
  2. Jessica
    Jessica says:

    Loved reading your latest Daphne. I was out in the garden yesterday digging up a new bed to plant sunflowers. I felt it was a healthy & happy way to sweat it out too ; )

    Reply
  3. Claudine
    Claudine says:

    Hi Daphne,

    Thank you for promoting the wonderful benefits dance to our health. I have taught many styles of dance over the years, including ballet, tap and jazz. Currently I teach Zumba classes. The response from my participants has been overwhelming in that they can’t believe they can sweat, lose weight, tone muscles and attain a ‘healthy glow’ all while having fun! It is that one hour a week they take for themselves to de-stress and get lost in the music so it is much more than just a ‘workout’ it also inspires positive emotions. Studies show that dance classes are very effective in preventing Alzheimer’s disease through the mind-body connection of learning new routines to music. My favourite phrase is “To dance is to live”.

    I look forward to following more your inspirational blog 🙂

    Reply
    • Daphne
      Daphne says:

      “To dance IS to live.” I 100% conquer with that phrase. It has now become my favourite phrase, thank you Claudine. Thank you for taking the time to provide your comments, but mostly thank you for helping make our world a better place, by inspiring people to move their bodies and to love to dance. The University of Western Sydney, recently completed a study that proved that dance is certainly beneficial in preventing dementia. The classes that you teach are particularly important also in preventing injuries as well as the long list of benefits that you mentioned. You clients also love your classes, because you exuberate such joy. xxx

      Reply

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